London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Investigation of communities at increased risk of trachoma recrudescence & a model post-elimination surveillance strategy

Primary research question

Is there evidence of on-going or recent ocular Ct transmission in communities of northern Ghana felt to be at increased risk of recrudescence, at least two years since they were identified with Ct infection and or high anti-Pgp3 seroprevalence during pre-validation trachoma surveillance surveys?

Secondary research questions

What is the geographical extent of the boundaries of any persistent Ct infection and on-going transmission in the post-elimination setting?

What is the community-level (anti-Pgp3) prevalence of seropositivity for the multiplex bead array (MBA) (and possibly ELISA) as compared to the lateral flow assay (LFA)?

Countries: Ghana
Diseases: Trachoma

Understanding areas of increased trachoma risk (hotspots) through the implementation of a post validation trachoma surveillance strategy

To determine if there is evidence of on-going or recent transmission in the “hotspot” communities of increased risk two years after they were identified during the pre-validation surveys (clinical, antibody and infection data).

Countries: Ghana
Diseases: Trachoma

The Global Atlas of Podoconiosis

Through funding from the Wellcome Trust to develop a global atlas of podoconiosis. We aim to advance new knowledge on the geographical distribution and spatial epidemiology of the disease.

i. Conduct national cross-sectional surveys in selected countries to validate the environmental predictive model developed using the mapping data in Ethiopia.

ii. Create evidence consensus maps, develop risk maps and ground-truthing work and delineate the spatial distribution and geographical limits of podoconiosis globally.

iii. Estimate the global burden of podoconiosis by quantifying the number affected, the population at risk and DALYs attributable.

iv. Estimate how much it will cost to control or eliminate podoconiosis globally.

 

Countries: Ethiopia | Cameroon | Rwanda | Uganda | Burundi | India
Diseases: Podoconiosis