London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

TUMIKIA project

The TUMIKIA Project aims to determine whether combining school- and community-based deworming is more effective at controling and eliminating soil-transmitted helminths (STH or intestinal worms) in Kenya than school-based deworming alone. 

The two-year trial will provide the drug albendazole to all residents from 150 communities in Kwale County, Kenya. There are three study groups:

  1. Base: annual school-based deworming (ages 2-14)
  2. Increased coverage: annual school- and community-based deworming (ages 2-99)
  3. Increased coverage and frequency: bi-annual school- and community-based deworming (ages 2-99)

TUMIKIA stands for 'Tuangamize Minyoo Kenya Imarisha Afya,' which means “eradicate worms in Kenya to improve health,” in Swahili. 

Download the TUMIKIA Research Brief [pdf]

Countries: Kenya

Trachoma in the Western Pacific

Determine whether current or historic C. trachomatis (Ct) infection can be detected, and whether it is associated with clinical signs of ‘trachomatous inflammation – follicular’ (TF) in Vanuatu and Kiribati

Determine the utility of infection testing as a tool for operational surveillance and impact assessment in trachoma-endemic environments.

Countries: Kiribati | Vanuatu
Diseases: Trachoma

Post-MDA LF Surveillance Modeling: Developing Stratified Risk Maps

The purpose of this project is to create maps that utilize LF risk and prevalence data to predict risk of recrudescence, and to stratify this risk into 3-4 distinct groups. Such maps could subsequently be used to design and simulate the performance of different surveillance strategies. 

Preliminary study findings:

  • The intensity of transmission was quantified by the basic reproductive number (R0).

  • A map of predicted prevalence of microfilaraemia, developed through Bayesian geostatistical modelling, was linked to mathematical models of the transmission dynamics of lymphatic filariasis.

  • The models predict a marked geographical heterogeneity in the intensity of lymphatic filariasis transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Further control efforts may be required in areas of higher intensity of transmission.

  • Conversely, interruption of transmission might be achieved earlier in areas of low intensity of transmission.

  • The results suggest that intensity of transmission at baseline (R0) and bednet use are the best indicators for the level of surveillance required sub-nationally post-MDA.