Haiti MOH

Addressing the Mental Health of Persons Living with Lymphatic Filariasis in Léogâne, Haiti: Effectiveness of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

Intervention: The primary aim of this project is to determine if the introduction of a Chronic Disease Self-Management curriculum into existing Hope Clubs in Léogâne, Haiti will result in improvements in symptoms of depression, self-rated health, chronic disease self-efficacy, social support, and disability.

Formative: What are the barriers that prevent people with LF from participating in Hope Clubs?

Countries: Haiti

Field Validation of Wb123 monoplex, Haiti

To compare the performance of antigen (FTS) and antibody (Wb123 monoplex) tools in programmatic settings (TAS).

Preliminary Findings and Lessons Learned

The goal of this study is to compare the performance of antigen (FTS) and antibody (Wb123 monoplex, Wb123 ELISA, multiplex) tools in programmatic settings (TAS). In order to strengthen the existing TAS platform we need to better understand which diagnostic indicator(s) are best-suited for making programmatic decisions. The TAS was conducted in Trou de Nord and Plaisance EUs.  Both EUs passed the TAS, but positive FTS were identified (4 and 2, respectively). However the Wb123 RDT found ZERO positive children, of the over 2000 tested. While the Wb123 ELISA testing is still ongoing, this initial result agrees with findings from other studies, all of which suggest that the Wb123 RDT is too insensitive a tool to be of programmatic use.

Countries: Haiti

A Programmatic Comparison of School- and Community-Based TAS

Determine whether school-based TAS results in the same programmatic conclusion as a community-based TAS in EUs where school attendance is poor.

Preliminary Findings and Lessons Learned

This USAID project represents an innovative approach to resolve critical questions about the performance of the TAS and in particular, the question of how important 75% school attendance is to a valid TAS result.  At its core, this study addresses the concern that LF (specifically antigenemia) could be associated with school attendance, which leads to the programmatic research question: does a school-based TAS result in the same programmatic conclusion as a community-based TAS in EUs where school attendance is poor? This study will lead to a better understanding of the validity of the TAS in programmatic settings where school attendance and/or reporting of school enrollment may be poor.  It will also generate important results for the Haitian program that is looking to the TAS for guidance on stopping MDA in several EUs. The school- and community-based TAS were both conducted in a commune considered to be highly endemic (‘zone rouge’) at baseline.  Both surveys passed the TAS, with only 1 ICT positive child identified in the school TAS and 4 ICT-positive children in the community-based TAS.  The conclusion is that there appears to be no meaningful difference between school- and community-based TAS for stopping MDA decisions, even where school attendance is poor. This is the third LFSC/NTDSC study to return a null result -- perhaps it can now be considered a "non-issue" for LF.

Countries: Haiti

ICT-FST Comparison in Low Prevalence setting of Haiti

Comparison of ICT, FST and Antibody tests in low-prevalence settings.

The multi-country studies on the same topic led to the endorsement by WHO for the FTS as an approved diagnostic tool.

Countries: Haiti